NC State Extension

Jill Sidebottom

Jill_IMG_1109

Area Extension Forestry Specialist

Mountain Conifer IPM

Responsibilities

Extension (100%): Mountain Conifer Integrated Pest Management

  • Providing support to the North Carolina Cooperative Extension agents with responsibilities for mountain conifers, primarily Christmas trees.
  • Developing scouting techniques and economic thresholds for insects, mites, and diseases of Christmas trees and commercially grown ornamental conifers.
  • Determining least-toxic pesticides and lowest rates for pest control.
  • Increasing the awareness of the benefits of IPM and facilitating its implementation by identifying and responding to clientele needs, and developing education programs and materials.
  • Assessing the adoption and impact of IPM to producers of mountain conifers.
  • Promoting the safe use of pesticides among Christmas tree growers and their farm workers.
  • Providing educational opportunities for those seeking to get their NC pesticide license in forestry.

Current Projects: 2011-2012

  • Continue to evaluate controls for elongate hemlock scale in Fraser fir Christmas trees.
  • Assess control practices of multiple pests in Christmas trees to reduce insecticide use, especially using systemic insecticides.
  • Develop recommendations for high-quality organic grown Christmas trees.
  • Evaluate the feasibility of IPM-labeling for Christmas tree retailers.
  • Promote farm pesticide safety to farm workers and educate workers in scouting techniques and IPM.

Background

B.S. University of Illinois

M.S. North Carolina State University

Ph.D. North Carolina State University

Jill R. Sidebottom graduated with a B.S.(1981) in Ornamental Horticulture from the University of Illinois. She received her M.S. (1984) and Ph.D. (1988) from North Carolina State University in Plant Pathology. Her master’s thesis was on the interaction of soil type and soil matric potential on sporangium production and infection of tobacco by Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae, the causal agent of black shank. Her doctorial thesis was on the use of cultural practices to enhance partial-resistance in peanut cultivars to Clindrocladium crotalariae, the causal agent of black rot in peanuts. Since 1988 she has been working with IPM on Christmas tree farms in western North Carolina.


Mountain Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center
455 Research Drive
Mills River, NC 28759
Phone: 828-684-3562 ~ Fax: 828-684-8715


E-mail: jill_sidebottom@ncsu.edu

Updated June 15, 2011

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